blockchain

Studying OAuth Protocols for BitRupee

OAuth Protocols

OAuth is an open standard for access delegation, commonly used as a way for Internet users to grant websites or applications access to their information on other websites but without giving them the passwords. OAuth provides clients a “secure delegated access” to server resources on behalf of a resource owner. It specifies a process for resource owners to authorize third-party access to their server resources without sharing their credentials. Designed specifically to work with Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP), OAuth essentially allows access tokens to be issued to third-party clients by an authorization server, with the approval of the resource owner. The third party then uses the access token to access the protected resources hosted by the resource server.

There are 3 main handlers in an OAuth transaction: the user, the consumer, and the service provider.

  • Step 1 – The User Shows Intent
  • Step 2 – The Consumer Gets Permission
  • Step 3 – The User Is Redirected to the Service Provider
  • Step 4 – The User Gives Permission
  • Step 5 – The Consumer Obtains an Access Token
  • Step 6 – The Consumer Accesses the Protected Resource

OAuth 2.0 is a complete redesign from OAuth 1.0, and the two are not compatible. OAuth 2.0 is faster and easier to implement. OAuth 1.0 used complicated cryptographic requirements, only supported three flows, and did not scale. OAuth 2.0, on the other hand, has six flows for different types of applications and requirements, and enables signed secrets over HTTPS. OAuth tokens no longer need to be encrypted on the endpoints in 2.0 since they are encrypted in transit.

OAuth 1.0

  • Transport-independent: Security is not delegated to HTTPS/TLS.
  • Founded in cryptography, especially digital signatures: Digital signatures are used to prove the integrity and authenticity of a message. Digital signatures can ensure that a certain message was sent from a specific source and that the message and signature were not tampered with in any way. A signed message is tied to its origin. It cannot be tampered with or copied to another source, but client-side implementations can be especially complex.
  • Messages are each individually cryptographically signed: If a single message within the communication is constructed or signed improperly, the entire transaction will be invalidated
  • Basic signature workflow.

    OAuth 2.0

    OAuth 2.0 is the industry-standard protocol for authorization. OAuth 2.0 focuses on client developer simplicity while providing specific authorization flows for web applications, desktop applications, mobile phones, and living room devices. An OAuth 2.0 Server is a piece of software that implements network protocol flows which allow a client (piece of software) to act on behalf of a user. Transport-dependent: Most security defenses are delegated to HTTPS/TLS. A typo, an improper TLS configuration, a failure to properly validate a certificate, or vulnerabilities in an underlying library can lead to a man-in-the-middle (MitM) attack, compromising all OAuth communications. Centered around bearer tokens: These are easy for integration but not great for security. Bearer tokens do not provide internal security mechanisms. They can be copied or stolen but are easier to implement. Much easier to work with: OAuth 2.0 is much more usable, but much more difficult to build securely. Much more flexible: OAuth 1.0 only handles web workflows, but OAuth 2.0 considers non-web clients as well. Better separation of duties: Handling resource requests and handling user authorization can be decoupled in OAuth 2.0. Basic signature workflow.

OpenID

OpenID is an open standard and decentralized authentication protocol. Promoted by the non-profit OpenID Foundation, it allows users to be authenticated by co-operating sites (known as relying parties, or RP) using a third-party service, eliminating the need for webmasters to provide their own ad hoc login systems, and allowing users to log into multiple unrelated websites without having to have a separate identity and password for each. Users create accounts by selecting an OpenID identity provider and then use those accounts to sign onto any website that accepts OpenID authentication. Several large organizations either issue or accept OpenIDs on their websites, according to the OpenID Foundation. The OpenID standard provides a framework for the communication that must take place between the identity provider and the OpenID acceptor (the “relying party”). An extension to the standard facilitates the transfer of user attributes, such as name and gender, from the OpenID identity provider to the relying party (each relying party may request a different set of attributes, depending on its requirements). The OpenID protocol does not rely on a central authority to authenticate a user’s identity. Moreover, neither services nor the OpenID standard may mandate a specific means by which to authenticate users, allowing for approaches ranging from the common (such as passwords) to the novel (such as smart cards or biometrics).

List of notable OAuth service providers:

Service ProviderOAuth ProtocolOpenID Connect
500px1.0a
Amazon2.0
Apple2.0Yes
Basecamp2.0No
Battle.net2.0
Bitbucket1.0a 2.0No
bitly2.0
Box2.0
Cloud Foundry2.0
Dailymotion2.0 draft 11
Deutsche Telekom2.0
deviantART2.0 drafts 10 and 15
Discogs1.0a
Discord2.0
Dropbox1.0, 2.0
Etsy1.0
Evernote1.0a
Facebook2.0 draft 12No
FatSecret1.0, 2.0
Fitbit2.0
Flickr1.0a
Formstack2.0
Foursquare2.0
GitHub2.0No
Goodreads1.0
Google2.0Yes
Google App Engine1.0a, 2.0Yes
Groundspeak1.0
Huddle2.0
Imgur2.0
Instagram2.0No
Intel Cloud Services2.0
Jive Software1.0a, 2.0
Keycloak2.0Yes
LinkedIn1.0a, 2.0No
Microsoft2.0Yes
Mixi1.0
MySpace1.0a
Netflix1.0a
NetIQ1.0a, 2.0Yes
Okta1.0a, 2.0Yes
OpenAM2.0
OpenStreetMap1.0, 1.0a
OpenTable1.0a
ORCID2.0
PayPal2.0
Ping Identity2.0
Pixiv2.0
Plurk1.0a
Reddit2.0
Salesforce.com1.0a, 2.0Yes
Sina Weibo2.0
Spotify2.0No
Stack Exchange2.0
StatusNet1.0a
Strava2.0
Stripe2.0
Trello1.0
Tumblr1.0a
Twitch2.0
Twitter1.0a, 2.0No
Ubuntu One1.0No
Viadeo2.0
Vimeo2.0No
VK2.0No
WeChat2.0No
Withings1.0
Woocommerce1.0a
Wordpress1.0a
WSO2 Identity Server1.0a, 2.0Yes
Xero1.0a
XING2.0
Yahoo!1.0a, 2.0
Yammer2.0
Yandex2.0
Yelp2.0

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